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Author Topic: Patching Ortlieb panniers  (Read 2346 times)

diegotailwind

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Patching Ortlieb panniers
« on: April 01, 2010, 09:51:47 PM »
I just got a brand new set of Ortlieb panniers, and they are pretty damn cool!  ;D

People say they are very resistant but as any material they can't be 100% puncture proof - otherwise Ortlieb won't be selling patch kit right?

So does anyone has any experience patching Ortlieb panniers? What is the best method so they stay waterproof and so the patch don't come off after the first rain or sunny day?

Is the Ortlieb patch kit the best way?

Weetbicks

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Re: Patching Ortlieb panniers
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2010, 12:58:41 AM »
I was attacked by a couple of dogs in Missouri while on a cross country tour in 2008,  they ripped into one of my panniers (back roller plus).  I patched it up with some duct tape on the inside,  problem solved.  I think the patch kits are a waste of time,  you'll very rarely need them unless you get attacked by dogs, or fall of your bike often :)  And I think duct tape is a much cheaper substitute.

Stephane

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Re: Patching Ortlieb panniers
« Reply #2 on: April 07, 2010, 08:28:58 AM »
I tried several ways to patch panniers and dry bags (and tents). Duct tape does work well but there are better options (unless the tear is really large, in which case duct tape is the only way). But first, the best advice I want to give is when you patch any kind of material, always put a patch on each side of the material. It makes the seal much more efficient and will last much longer. Duct tape is cheap and makes a really good temporary fix. However, duct tape is not good at resisting high temperatures from the sun alternating with heavy rain (I learned from a bad experience in Arizona).  Over time, the glue sort of melts and the tape starts to peel off, leaving a terrible gooey layer (this is not very nice on the inside of the bag).

That being said, I always carry some duct tape with me (you can fix pretty much anything with duct tape!).  Obviously, a whole dispenser is way too heavy, so I carry the Handy Duct Tape manufactured by Coghlan's.

But when it comes to patching my panniers or my tent, I much prefer a nice and clean fix that will hold very well in the long run. For that matter, I use either the Seam Grip glue (hopefully available soon at CycloCamping.com) and any kind of heavy duty waterproof patches or the Ortlieb Classic Fabric Patch Kit (PD620). The trick is to use two patches on each side of the material that needs to be fixed, to spread a good amount of glue (don't be shy), then to put these three layers between two books and let the whole thing sit overnight under something really heavy (I like to put it underneath one foot of the bed before I go to sleep so that it's ready to go in the morning). I used this technique on many different materials some years ago and the patches are still as strong and as waterproof as they were on the very first day.  It works on vinyl, nylon, cordura, and polyester (PU or PVC coated).

I tried the Ortlieb Patch kit and it works just as good. The advantage of the patch kit is that the material used is really the perfect quality - not too light (like the patches found in most tent repair kits) and not too heavy (good enough for tents but not for panniers or dry bags).  Plus, the kit is nice and compact and has just what you need so that you don't have to carry a whole tube of Seam Grip glue.

Here is a good selection of repair kits and patches for all budgets.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2010, 12:34:30 PM by Stephane »
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petervanglabbeek

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Re: Patching Ortlieb panniers
« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2010, 04:35:46 AM »
Of course Ortlieb panniers can get punctures and will not be waterproof forever. In my case the bottom wears first, just from putting the pannier on the ground all the time. After a year of continuous use you will start to see the first damage, soon to become tiny holes.
I pitched a small hole in the bottom of my Ortlieb pannier (classic roller) once with the glue and patch to repair punctures in tires. It lasted almost a year, but of course is not the best solution.

Also be careful where your pannier is touching the rack. If it is on the PVC material it will wear soon. Make sure it just touches the rack with hard plastic parts and maybe think about some kind of protection as the rack will get damaged soon, especially alu racks. Wrap a part of an old inner tube around this part of the rack and fix it with duc tape.

Peter
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El_Cargonista

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Re: Patching Ortlieb panniers
« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2010, 07:50:27 PM »
I also had a dog attack (Rottweiler) that caused me to lay my bike down at about 20+mph, causing my (then brand-new) Ortlieb bags to rip in several places. Picked up a patch kit (Ortlieb's version) and with the SeamSeal glue, made 'em good as new. Just another vote for the fact that they are fixable bags. Stephane summed it up nicely in his post (above).


On Two Wheels

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Re: Patching Ortlieb panniers
« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2010, 08:57:23 PM »
When it comes to patching your bags, or any other piece of material (Non clothing) can I make the following suggestion.

Don't just cut a patch oversized to cover the hole, but if you can find something round - a large coin, a can, or anything that will cover your hole completely, draw around it on the piece you are going to be using as a patch. Cut it out, so so that you now have a round patch instead of just a simple square, apply the round patch to the outside of your hole and a secondary patch (shape doesn't matter) to the inside.

Why use a round patch on the outside? Using a round patch eliminates corners and straight edges on your patch and makes it less likely to snag on things.

Just my way of doing things thats all.
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