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Author Topic: Simplicity is the key  (Read 1443 times)

hartleymartin

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Simplicity is the key
« on: February 08, 2011, 08:08:04 PM »
Keep things simple. I use Dia-Compe Retro-Friction shifters, which require no adjustments aside from ensuring the upper and lower limit stops are set on the derailleurs. My brake levers are non-aero type, and all of them are very easy to replace the cable inners. I run a 6-speed freewheel, and carry the freewheel removal tool. The rear spacing is 120mm, so bent/broken axles are less of a problem than if I were running a 127mm rear-spacing. STI levers, indexing, etc are un-neccessary complications.

petervanglabbeek

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Re: Simplicity is the key
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2011, 03:38:03 AM »
I also like simplicity. But also the parts have to be available in the places where you travel.
Unfortunately Shimano sets the standard all over the world, and simplicity seems not to be too important for them.
I guess profit is the keyword.
Are the parts that you mention available in Asia or South America for example?
Peter
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fenlabiz

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Re: Simplicity is the key
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2011, 11:10:35 AM »
Are the parts that you mention available in Asia or South America for example?
Even though Dia-Compe is a Japanese brand, their product are difficult in Asia (as fa as I know). You probably can find them is some part of China (HK, shanghai etc.) but that's about it. Perhaps in BKK? As for South America, forget about it... even in USA it is not so easy to find what you need!

hartleymartin

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Re: Simplicity is the key
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2011, 05:03:18 PM »
Dia-Compe Retro-friction shifters have very little that can go wrong with them. I've also got Suntour Bar-End shifters which have the same mechanism in them which are over 30 years old and still going great. Basically my point is that the bicycle should be so simple that little can go wrong with it to start with.

I will also admit that most of my touring is the short weekend or week-long trip variety, so I don't always need to worry about a large cache of spare parts, aside from brake and gear cables and spare spokes.