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Author Topic: requirement tents / amry tents  (Read 4387 times)

taliesyn427

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requirement tents / amry tents
« on: July 12, 2010, 12:13:57 AM »
Hello fellow bicycle travellers,

Planning a trip to India through Eurpoe and the Silk Road, I wonder about what a good tent is.
besides I see extreme differences in prices (Hilleberg ultralight 1 person €500!).
as well as extremely cheap, lately I found the army tents sold in dumpstores for some 50€
Does one of you has experience about army tents?

to me key features for a good tent are
- weight: 3kg too much.
- impermeability, what's a good water resistance value?
- space, well it's a shelter for when I sleep, with enough space for my paniers.
- ease to mount, I guess it becomes easier with months of ailay mount unmount!
- geodesic or tunnel? is it really needed to have a geodesic, do you happen to camp in places where it's not possible to plant any pile?

thanks for your answers
Françøis

onrbikes

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Re: requirement tents / amry tents
« Reply #1 on: July 12, 2010, 02:35:20 AM »
Would love to follow your trip. Where? When?
We'll be doing greece to china, starting in february.

 We use the Tarn3 from MEC. We used to use the Tarn2 but found it a tight squeeze for 2 of us, but it was bulletproof. 
  Great for one person, and under $300. Well under 3kgs easy to put up aerodynamic, and can be put up anywhere.

MEC is a Canadian camping store and can be found online.

Fred

On Two Wheels

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Re: requirement tents / amry tents
« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2010, 02:44:23 AM »
Hi, just done the Europe part of similar trip.

When I set off I bought the best tent possible in my price range max 250 euros. I was rather niave and was only thinking europe (and it was still frosty when I set off) so I opted for a double skin tent (fly and inner). Fly erection first then inner - helps keep gear dry if you need to erect in rain.

Tent served me well while doing the europe part, but I'm now I'm in Turkey I'm regretting the style of tent I chose.  You really need to be looking at a tent where the inner is erected first then if needed using the fly. Inner erection first is ideal for the hotter climates where you only really need the inner to keep the mosquitoes and bugs away.

I'm still using my tent, but believe me it gets quite hot inside when you have put it up, and the mozzies still get you until you manage to get the inner fitted.

However, I am in the process of modifying the inner so the poles will go through the loops and then all I need to do is erect the inner.

Hope this little snippet helps in your decision.
You may say that I'm a dreamer, But I'm not the only one.
I hope someday you'll join us, And we can cycle the world as one.

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taliesyn427

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Re: requirement tents / amry tents
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2010, 03:57:31 AM »
HI,

Thanks for the answers, I'd like to now your opinion about army tents -something tells me they should be good quality but can't find more-
I think I should not bother too much, knowing it's not raining so much and shelter could be found anywhere if it's really hard.

mec.ca, is a good store, in Europe prices are way higher than on the other side of the ocean, I wonder why!!

>> onrbikes:  I plan to start my trip from Utrecht, The Netherlands in March 2010, I plan 2 months to relaxedly reach Greence -Tessaloniki-

Best regards
François

onrbikes

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Re: requirement tents / amry tents
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2010, 09:48:57 PM »
Hey Francois

Did you mean march 2011?
Cause we're already into July 2010 unless ur travellin faster than time.
  We too are planning Mar 2011. Fly from Oz to Frankfurt, then to Crete. Should enter Turkey 1st week of March and up to Ankara for the visas. Into Iran late April.
 5-6 weeks there and then the Stans in the heat!!

  Keep in touch if this sounds about the same time frame, except you'll be lazing and fattening up on the islands.
We'll be having another journal on crazyguyonabike.

ATB
Fred

tony

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Re: requirement tents / amry tents
« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2010, 01:02:13 PM »
Francois,

Sorry I wonder how I missed your original post.

Army tent are not really suited for touring. They are usually bulky, heavy, don't breath too well and some of them are a pain in the neck to set up. I tried a couple of them when I was younger (not while bike-touring) but I would not recommend them on a bike trip. I mean, if you have one and go for a 2 weeks trip and don't want to buy another one I guees it is fine but I would not recommend one for an extended period of time.

For the water resistance value: Materials rated 1500mm or 10000mm will have the same waterpoofness (unless you are camping with a tornado going on around you). The difference is that a tent rated 1500 will start to leak much sooner than one with 10000 especially without any maintenance. It really depends how much usage and under what condition you'll use your tent. If it is only for a few month at a time so you can do some maintenance in between trips and that you won't camp under extreme weather or be camping in places where the tent will not get dragged around, get muddy, etc. a 1500 will be fine. My tent had a 5000-ripstop fly and started to leak after 3 years of intensive use and no maintenance at all (I learn later how to take care of my tent so it will last longer). The material of my tent was so saturated with dirt, that I had to argue a long time to not have it confiscated by the customs in order to enter New Zealand.

Space: If you plan to travel for a while you might want a large vestibule so you can eat or just chill out when it's raining or cold.

Any modern tent are easy enough to set up. And as you said you'll get an expert in no time. I haven't seen any modern tent that you can not mount in less than 10 min.

Tunnel vs. Geodesic is one of those hot topics. personnally I would not travel with a tunnel anymore but many people do. The main reason is that with a free standing tent you have much more options to find a place to camp. Many times I camped in places where I was not able to pitch the tent.


petervanglabbeek

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Re: requirement tents / amry tents
« Reply #6 on: August 02, 2010, 06:21:06 AM »
Hello Francois,
I used the Vaude Odyssee for more than 4 years. I bought it in de Kampeermarkt in Eindhoven for 285 Euro. It is an excellent tent, only 1.8kg and sleeps two persons, so enough room for your panniers when you travel alone.
Maybe you can find one second hand on Marktplaats. Or check cyclocamping.com for a similar tent, they have good prices.
I would also suggest one with a free standing inner tent (like the Odyssee), as most of your trip will be hot and dry. I rarely put on the fly in Asia. for the few rainy days you will need a water proof fly. Many of the cheaper tents have only a 1500mm water column fly, choose at least 3000mm.
I can't tell you anything about army tents.
See you,
Peter
Peter van Glabbeek

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Re: requirement tents / amry tents
« Reply #7 on: August 16, 2010, 11:48:11 AM »
Hello Francois! In response to Tony regarding the waterproofness of tents. The 1500 or 10000 or what have you refers to the amount of water pressure that the tent material can withstand before water is allowed to permeate through it. So a 10000mm coated tent can withstand 10000mm of water pressure (that is if you had a 10000mm long tube filled with water and covered the end with the tent material, the material ought not to leak. I have an MSR Hubba Hubba and it has a 1500mm coated fly and I have definately been in rain storms where the rain was hard enough that I would get a little spritz right through the fly occasionally (I still think the Hubba Hubba is among the best tents available today... although you might find yourself in a hiker/biker site getting lost in a sea of them trying to find yours haha). That being said, 1500mm is a very common fly coating, normally with 10000mm coated floors. The 10000mm coatings will definately be more durable. However, normally, the lighter you go, the less waterproof the material will be. (For example, a Big Agnus Seedhouse has only a 2500mm coated floor). I noticed some talk about MEC tents on here as well. They are definately among the most durable tents you will find (but not as light as say a Hubba or a Seedhouse). The MEC Gemini (or the Appolo for a slightly larger tent) is my personal favourite (I work at MEC so may be biased...) -- easy to set up (similar to the Hubba Hubba), lightweight, durable, spacious, and well vented. And like Tony said, using a ground sheet, keeping your tent clean and using a solar/waterproofer every now and again will extend the life of your tent considerably! Cheers! (PS: Enjoy the ride through Central Asia, if/WHEN you get stuck for visas in Bishkek, might I recommend Sakhura Guesthouse, you won't be disappointed!).

Just Tinkering

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Re: requirement tents / amry tents
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2010, 12:38:53 PM »
If you are looking for a light weight tent, you might consider a Tarptent by Henry Shire.  I just bought a Rainshadow II with the additional front poles.  The total weight is 3 pounds and it is a 3 person tent: the price was $275 US

Best regards,

taliesyn427

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Re: requirement tents / amry tents
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2010, 02:13:25 PM »
I found the WEchsel Pathfinder in Germany, and I took the light version: ZG.
Now I have been camping for 2 weeks in autumn, I can say
- geodesic, good points, I do not need to plant pikes! Sometimes I even can't
- low -75cm- , very discrete, good against wind, but even the small guy I am can't sit straight spine
- space: I find it enough, the paniers are in the outer vestibule
- waterproof: I have received a couple drops of water when it rained hard, I bet I will have to waterproff spray some day... The lighter version's water resistance is only 2000mm instead of 7000 for the regular version... I may have done a wrong choice there

I like the opneing on the side rather than at one end which would make me feel like entering a tunnel

a message to onrbikes >>> as you can read I am already on my way, currently crossing Europe. I plan to start cycle Turkey in March, so there is a big chance our dates match for meeting there . If I have not been froyen meanwhile!

Gotte

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Re: requirement tents / amry tents
« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2011, 12:46:44 PM »
I've got one of these:

http://www.decathlon.co.uk/EN/lightent-3246909/

It's lightweight, 1.5 kg, small, and not too expensive. I really like it. It's only one man, bet suits me. I like its low profile (much less open to the wind). the only downside is that it's outer pitch first, which means if it's throwing it down, the inside of the tent tend to get wet. I did find, however, you can leave the outer and inner attatched and put the poles in when setting up. This means you can keep the inside dry, and it doesn;t affect the packing. Mine is grey/blue, btw, not red, which is a bit bright for my liking.

On Two Wheels

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Re: requirement tents / amry tents
« Reply #11 on: January 16, 2011, 04:31:37 PM »
I've got one of these:

http://www.decathlon.co.uk/EN/lightent-3246909/

It's lightweight, 1.5 kg, small, and not too expensive. I really like it. It's only one man, bet suits me. I like its low profile (much less open to the wind). the only downside is that it's outer pitch first, which means if it's throwing it down, the inside of the tent tend to get wet. I did find, however, you can leave the outer and inner attatched and put the poles in when setting up. This means you can keep the inside dry, and it doesn;t affect the packing. Mine is grey/blue, btw, not red, which is a bit bright for my liking.


I think outer pitch tents are better if it is raining.  At least you can put up some shelter while finishing off putting up your tent. Anyway, do you lay out your pent before erecting it ? I just take out of the bag the bits I need. Erect the outer, place things inside it while attaching the inner. I'm dry the inner stays dry and things are better.
You may say that I'm a dreamer, But I'm not the only one.
I hope someday you'll join us, And we can cycle the world as one.

Imagine no possessions, I wonder if you can.
No need for greed or hunger, A brotherhood of man.
Imagine all the people, Sharing all the world...

Crystal

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Re: requirement tents / amry tents
« Reply #12 on: January 18, 2011, 08:37:47 AM »
I think outer pitch tents are better if it is raining.

I think he meant that the inner part pitches first as it is the way most (if not all) Ferrino tents are set-up.

hartleymartin

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Re: requirement tents / amry tents
« Reply #13 on: January 25, 2011, 05:15:11 AM »
I reckon that a tent fly is a good idea, such as a hutchie - something that you can string up as a temporary shelter if it is raining, or as an additional covered area outside your sleeping tent. It is an extra thing to carry, but it is a useful extra comfort.

jason

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Re: requirement tents / amry tents
« Reply #14 on: September 12, 2011, 05:51:37 AM »
I second with @hartleymartin  :)