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Author Topic: How to choose the right stove for your bicycle journey?  (Read 5692 times)

Stephane

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Re: How to choose the right stove for your bicycle journey?
« Reply #15 on: November 17, 2010, 09:28:57 AM »
I am curious, what are the " freeze-dried egg mixes"?
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ardent.ryder

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Re: How to choose the right stove for your bicycle journey?
« Reply #16 on: November 17, 2010, 09:44:00 AM »
http://www.mec.ca/Products/product_listing.jsp?FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id=2534374302695567

Most of these Egg or Omelette mixes will burn on the bottom of your pan really easily if the heat is too high. That's where the Trangia stove comes in handy!

Stephane

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Re: How to choose the right stove for your bicycle journey?
« Reply #17 on: November 18, 2010, 03:15:58 PM »
oh I see, interesting. I never really used dry package food on a bicycle tour. In my first long trip I took a couple packages in case of emergency and ended up to travel with them for almost a year before using them (It was because I was tired of seeing them in my panniers  ::) rather than for emergency). I like them when I hike though.
Just in case it might interests you: I  don't have have any more sticky-burning issue since I use the non-stick titanium cookware by Evernew. Their product lines are really fantastic and completely changed the way I see cooking around the camp. There is definitely reasons why they won the backpacker magazine awards in 2005 and again in 2010. The quality of the non abrasive layer is excellent (although I am very careful to not scratch it), not to mention that thanks to the titanium material you can get a 2L pot and a 3/4L pan for a total of 10.6oz! You can't beat that. Of course the downside with titanium is that it doesn't conduct heat as well as aluminum so it takes a couple minutes longer to boil water; but it is way stronger - even stronger than stainless steel. Anyway, in case you need to get some new cookware, this is worth to check it out.
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petervanglabbeek

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Re: How to choose the right stove for your bicycle journey?
« Reply #18 on: December 19, 2010, 06:09:40 AM »
In our most recent trip in the UK and Ireland we used the Trangia alcohol stove. It was the first time for me to use it for a longer tour. Before I was always using a multi fuel stove. So I thought to write a little about my experiences here. Some of it is the same as Steve Tober writes.

Some clear pros are:
No noise (very important to me). Less smelly (but there is some smell). Very easy to light. Nothing can break. Fuel left overs can be used again.

Some cons:
-Fuel is expensive. About 4 pounds (5 Euro) per liter in the UK, but up to double that price in remoter parts of Scotland and Ireland. In the Netherlands I found a 1 liter bottle for 1 Euro, In Belgium 3 Euro.
-My pots got really dirty. I think it is the colorant that is added to it that makes the black smoke.
-Rather slow for preparing dinner for two.

In general I like the Trangia stove very much. Especially the silence compared to some of the MSR stoves is wonderful. It wouldn't be good in extreme conditions where you have to melt snow or boil large quantaties of water.

Does anyone have experience on a world tour with the Trangia? How is it on altitude?

Peter
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postiebrian

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Re: How to choose the right stove for your bicycle journey?
« Reply #19 on: December 31, 2010, 10:08:44 AM »
Hi All,
  There is a add on for the trangia that converts it to use gas good for the cold weather.

hartleymartin

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Re: How to choose the right stove for your bicycle journey?
« Reply #20 on: January 25, 2011, 05:10:22 AM »
Click here for instructions to build yourself a D-I-Y alcohol stove from two beverage cans. It weighs practically nothing, costs practically nothing to make, and the methylated spirits used to fuel it is relatively cheap. The one I built burns for about 7 minutes on about 45 ml of spirit and is powerful enough to boil a small pot of potatoes. It fits inside my dixie-pan set (camping pans). I use a milo-tin lid as the primer-pan (this also fits into the whole kit). It is remarkably compact and efficient. I don't know why I would ever bother with any other type of camp stove. It's even better than the heximine stoves you get from the military disposals.

Belou

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Re: How to choose the right stove for your bicycle journey?
« Reply #21 on: January 25, 2011, 08:57:26 AM »
Click here It fits inside my dixie-pan set (camping pans).
Interesting. I was wondering, putting your home-made stove in your pan, does it make your pan set stink?? Did you try it at higher altitude, I'm curious to know how it would perform in such condition? One of the down side I see with that system is that it is not so easy to find methylated spirit, plus when you buy some, it always come in large quanity (minimum 1L) which come heavier than 250ml of gasoline and a backpacking stove combined. Personally, I rather use a stove that can use gasoline (which is also much cheaper than spirits) so it allows me to carry only small quantity of fuel at a time.

hartleymartin

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Re: How to choose the right stove for your bicycle journey?
« Reply #22 on: January 26, 2011, 03:59:34 AM »
No smells left in the dixie-pan. Methylated Spirit seems to burn pretty clean. I use about 45-50ml per "burn", so a 500mL bottle gives me about 10 "burns" and a 1L gives me 20 burns. I don't mind carrying 2x 500mL bottles - I like my hot meals when I'm on the road. I don't mind carrying potatoes, onions and cured meats either...

Belou

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Re: How to choose the right stove for your bicycle journey?
« Reply #23 on: January 29, 2011, 01:36:25 PM »
This is a very good stove also. needs mentioning.
MSR Simmerlite Stove
I tried many stoves, and for me this is the BEST one. Light, sturdy, great for simmering, easy to clean, and very silent.

gnpais

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Re: How to choose the right stove for your bicycle journey?
« Reply #24 on: May 18, 2011, 08:15:40 AM »
Hi.
I used a small alcohol stove, but then i don't like to carry alcohol in my bicycle. I've turned to rocket stoves and i'm pretty happy with that. Not much fuel (cheap one) not much smoke, small to carry and cheap (I did one with the walls of an old pc).

But then again, i never rode in snow or extreme weather.

Cheers
GPais - Portuguese tourer
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